• Bee Vectoring Technologies (BEE) is planning to conduct a new multi-year research trial of its agricultural system on blueberries
  • The trial will take place in collaboration with the Institute for Sustainable Horticulture, at Kwantlen Polytechnic University in British Columbia
  • During the trial, BVT will evaluate the efficacy of its biological fungicide, CR-7, against fungal diseases in blueberry crops
  • Results from the trial will form part of the company’s application for Canadian registration, and support its future marketing strategies
  • Bee Vectoring Technologies (BEE) is down 3.57 per cent and is currently trading at C$0.27 per share

Bee Vectoring Technologies (BEE) is planning to conduct a new multi-year research trial of its agricultural system on blueberries.

The company will collaborate on the trial with the Institute for Sustainable Horticulture, at British Columbia’s Kwantlen Polytechnic University (KPU). British Columbia is a major blueberry growing region in Canada, which as a nation is the second largest producer and exporter of blueberries in the world.

Local berry farmers in the area will be tapped for trial locations, in order to build awareness and demand for BVT’s agricultural system in the province. 

During the trial, the company will evaluate how effective its biological fungicide, CR-7, is against fungal diseases in blueberry crops. The results of the trial will form a part of BVT’s submitted application for Canadian registry. The company will also use the scientific data to market its agricultural system to highbush blueberry growers. 

BVT’s CEO, Ashish Malik, said that British Columbia’s climate, high disease pressures, and agricultural practices align well with the company’s technology.

“The Institute for Sustainable Horticulture at KPU has an established relationship with the BC Blueberry Council. They are keen to investigate new, sustainable disease management tools, and are well suited to manage these trials as the lead research group.

“Blueberries are susceptible to a number of common fungal diseases that can wreak havoc on plant health, berry yield, and shelf life from farm to plate, including Colletotrichum (anthracnose), Botrytis (gray mold), and Monilinia (mummy berry).

“The BVT system has been specifically engineered to target these fungal diseases, and we look forward to quantifying both disease control and crop yield improvements through multi-year season trials with the research group and participating growers,” he said.

Bee Vectoring Technologies (BEE) is down 3.57 per cent and is trading at $0.27 per share, as of 10:11am EDT.

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